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Thread: 2022 NPL Youth thread

  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by AVB View Post
    I think we need to stop blaming the individual clubs for this and start considering that there may be greater issues at play here that need addressing such as the competitiveness of the competitions.

    I'm sure all clubs are doing their absolute best to attract players in all age groups but if there arenít enough players interested in playing then what can clubs do? Anyone who thinks that clubs not fielding teams has anything to do with the club not working hard enough or not prioritising it enough simply wrong.

    The u16s age group is clearly the biggest example here - 3 teams in the NL1 and 1 team in the NPL havenít been able to field a team. Anecdotally there was a few clubs who were struggling in NPL to fill their u16s team until Cooks Hill withdrew and the players they had were redistributed. Everyoneís favourite example of the best NL1 club New Lambton have even been advertising his week for players for their u16s team, so they can't be flush either.

    To NNSW credit they have clearly identified issues here as well and are engaging clubs on how to restructure the Youth grades across the board to make it more competitive.
    One of the biggest problems I see is that every year we see large numbers of teams being taken from NL1 into NPL. But the kids being dropped from NPL aren't going back to NL1 teams. Some do but plenty either go to another sport or go to community because they have just spent the past year losing to 3/4 of teams by a lot.

    Hopefully this decoupling will ensure that clubs that are struggling in NPL will now face equal competition and enjoy the game because they win or if they lose it isn't by 7-8 goals every week and will keep players in the game allowing other clubs to start filling up their teams.

    If one of these teams that do get dropped to a lower division start improving then ensure there is promotion/relegation to bump them up and get tested against tougher teams. No point in splitting up the comp to not have promotion and relegation to just go back to the same issues we have now

  2. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim wallis View Post
    Checking the NL1 youth draw. Surprised to see how many teams are missing.

    13 Toronto Singo
    14 Wallsend
    15 Toronto
    16 Toronto Singo Wallsend

    Not sure if a club deserves a spot when there's more than 1 Youth team missing.
    Or are Youth teams even important any more with so many senior players changing clubs all the time now.
    How did Wallsend lose a 14ís team when they had a 13ís last year

  3. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Hacker View Post
    How did Wallsend lose a 14’s team when they had a 13’s last year
    -88 goal difference in 16 games?
    All opinions expressed here are my own.

    "Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn." -Benjamin Franklin

  4. #84
    Quote Originally Posted by AVB View Post
    I think we need to stop blaming the individual clubs for this and start considering that there may be greater issues at play here that need addressing such as the competitiveness of the competitions.

    I'm sure all clubs are doing their absolute best to attract players in all age groups but if there aren’t enough players interested in playing then what can clubs do? Anyone who thinks that clubs not fielding teams has anything to do with the club not working hard enough or not prioritising it enough simply wrong.

    The u16s age group is clearly the biggest example here - 3 teams in the NL1 and 1 team in the NPL haven’t been able to field a team. Anecdotally there was a few clubs who were struggling in NPL to fill their u16s team until Cooks Hill withdrew and the players they had were redistributed. Everyone’s favourite example of the best NL1 club New Lambton have even been advertising his week for players for their u16s team, so they can't be flush either.

    To NNSW credit they have clearly identified issues here as well and are engaging clubs on how to restructure the Youth grades across the board to make it more competitive.
    Disagree here.
    Its the clubs responsibility to fill their quota. Hard work is fantastic but that does not enter the equation. If a club is missing 3 out of 4 teams then that is a disgrace.
    They should have seen the alarm bells, informed Northern and dropped youth altogether and saved a bye for all those divisions.
    It inconveniences 3 other grades for the year. To Northerns credit they did alter the 16s draw so they play nearly every week.
    At this point we havent the Youth to cover the 23 teams in top 2 divs so maybe clubs need to take this point for future planning.
    Can 2 clubs join Youth teams together for a year? i dunno.
    Last edited by Eastwest; 17-02-2022 at 02:14 PM.

  5. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by AVB View Post
    I think we need to stop blaming the individual clubs for this and start considering that there may be greater issues at play here that need addressing such as the competitiveness of the competitions.

    I'm sure all clubs are doing their absolute best to attract players in all age groups but if there aren’t enough players interested in playing then what can clubs do? Anyone who thinks that clubs not fielding teams has anything to do with the club not working hard enough or not prioritising it enough simply wrong.

    The u16s age group is clearly the biggest example here - 3 teams in the NL1 and 1 team in the NPL haven’t been able to field a team. Anecdotally there was a few clubs who were struggling in NPL to fill their u16s team until Cooks Hill withdrew and the players they had were redistributed. Everyone’s favourite example of the best NL1 club New Lambton have even been advertising his week for players for their u16s team, so they can't be flush either.

    To NNSW credit they have clearly identified issues here as well and are engaging clubs on how to restructure the Youth grades across the board to make it more competitive.
    I follow both the boys and girls (having one of each) and in the WNPL this has been an identified issue for a while (the loss of players and talent in the teenage years) and something they have been trying to find solutions to, including changing how often and when they train etc, to try and help deconflict life and football being at odds. I think there probably needs to be a working group for both WNPL and NPL/NL1 to look at what the issues are that end up with kids that stop playing and creative solutions to help stop the attrition of players out of the sport, its also why they change age grouping's in the women's to keep the girls in the game. You wouldn't want to drop teams as they get older as a first resort, but good players with a bit of smarts who are fighting for 15's spots could likely put their hand up and play 16's for two years if they wanted, especially if they are up for the challenge.

  6. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by AVB View Post
    I think we need to stop blaming the individual clubs for this and start considering that there may be greater issues at play here that need addressing such as the competitiveness of the competitions.

    I'm sure all clubs are doing their absolute best to attract players in all age groups but if there aren’t enough players interested in playing then what can clubs do? Anyone who thinks that clubs not fielding teams has anything to do with the club not working hard enough or not prioritising it enough simply wrong.

    The u16s age group is clearly the biggest example here - 3 teams in the NL1 and 1 team in the NPL haven’t been able to field a team. Anecdotally there was a few clubs who were struggling in NPL to fill their u16s team until Cooks Hill withdrew and the players they had were redistributed. Everyone’s favourite example of the best NL1 club New Lambton have even been advertising his week for players for their u16s team, so they can't be flush either.

    To NNSW credit they have clearly identified issues here as well and are engaging clubs on how to restructure the Youth grades across the board to make it more competitive.
    NL Coach comes into our shop every day. They sent 3 boys up to 18s after 5 18s went to Reserve Grade. They kept a big group in 15s to promote kids as Clayton Zane prefers kids progressing up rather than staying and dominating. Then Azzurri took one of the remaining 16s after they lost a kid to Jets. Instead of bringing a kid back they asked a question. Far from the scenario of other Clubs and a sign that they have a good TD.

  7. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBscone View Post
    NL Coach comes into our shop every day. They sent 3 boys up to 18s after 5 18s went to Reserve Grade. They kept a big group in 15s to promote kids as Clayton Zane prefers kids progressing up rather than staying and dominating. Then Azzurri took one of the remaining 16s after they lost a kid to Jets. Instead of bringing a kid back they asked a question. Far from the scenario of other Clubs and a sign that they have a good TD.
    CZ all over it. Albeit he did have a string group right through to start with.

  8. #88
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    16s is a tough age group. The good ones go up, the bored ones drop out and once the dominoes start to fall, the squad can be depleted very quickly

  9. #89
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    Dream to play pro sport stings the pocket as Hunter parents pay $2000 for kids to play NH
    Anyone got a copy of this from NewHerald?
    Quote Originally Posted by Newysports2.0 View Post
    The name is obviously a pisstake if you canít tell
    Quote Originally Posted by Jardelsimage View Post
    the pisstake is on, who would call themselves after a pedo.....

  10. #90
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    Dream to play pro sport stings the pocket as Hunter parents pay up to $2000 for kids to play

    By Damon Cronshaw
    Updated February 19 2022 - 10:24am, first published 5:30am


    Parents are paying up to $2000 for their kids to play premier league football in the Hunter, as they pursue the dream of a professional career in the sport.
    Many are willing to pay the fees, amid aspirations to higher levels of competition, excellence, achievement and status. Some, though, are concerned about where the money is going and how far prices will rise in future.

    Various National Premier League [NPL] club insiders believe some youth fees are being used towards paying first grade players at some clubs to varying degrees.
    Northern NSW Football has warned clubs that youth fees cannot be used to pay senior players.
    The clubs aim to cover player payments for first graders with sponsorship from companies and benefactors, along with gate receipts and canteen revenue.

    First-grade players can generally earn payments per match of about $200 to $250 (rookies) and $350 to $500 (experienced). Top players stepping down from the A-League can earn about $1000 to $1500 a match. Some suspect the fees for the ex-pros are rising higher.
    Dream to play pro sport stings the pocket as Hunter parents pay up to $2000 for kids to play
    Dream to play pro sport stings the pocket as Hunter parents pay up to $2000 for kids to play
    Team budgets for player payments can generally run from about $55,000 to $180,000 a season.
    There is also a push to pay senior female players, with the inaugural season of the Northern NSW National Premier Leagues Women (NPLW) to begin next month.
    Northern NSW Football chief executive David Eland said "players can be paid, but they have to be on a professional contract".
    "There are no professional contracts within our competitions - our NPL and NPLW are amateur competitions," Mr Eland said.
    "There's an amount of up to $110 a week where clubs can reimburse players for expenses incurred whilst playing. But strictly, by the National Registration Regulations, we don't have any professional players."
    Asked if the clubs could be semi-professional, Mr Eland said: "No, there's no such thing".


    Mr Eland said consultation was occurring with clubs to introduce professional contracts. This is linked to plans for the top senior league to have "professional status". "That is aligned to the A-League, domestic calendar and has big implications for our competitions."
    As for youth fees, Mr Eland encouraged parents to ask clubs what they include. "Clubs are run by hardworking volunteers and they put a lot of work in to determine the fees. It's not up to us to micromanage the clubs."
    He said the NPL youth fees "vary significantly" from club to club because they were run differently. The junior and youth fees range from about $1000 to $2000 a season, depending on the club.
    Adamstown Rosebud secretary Rick Naylor said he was opposed to youth payments being used to pay seniors.
    Dream to play pro sport stings the pocket as Hunter parents pay up to $2000 for kids to play
    Dream to play pro sport stings the pocket as Hunter parents pay up to $2000 for kids to play
    "Youth fees should cover the cost of youth football. They shouldn't be subsidising the expenses a club incurs elsewhere," Mr Naylor said.


    "When we register our JDL [Junior Development League under 9s-12s] and youth players [under 13s-16s], we present the players and parents with a spreadsheet, showing them exactly where the money goes.
    "The youth and JDL fees are quarantined from seniors."
    Mr Naylor said Adamstown aimed to promote youth players through the ranks to first grade.
    "We'd like to think that many of our first grade players are playing because they love playing football."
    Broadmeadow Magic president Tony Temelkovski said "all fees collected from youth are pumped back into the youth".
    "The criteria for kids playing at a higher level means there's a certain standard of coaching we need to provide at club level," he said.


    "An average NPL youth coach spends 475 to 500 hours a year coaching the side. We run a 40-week program for our NPL youth."
    Youth coaches can attract about $1500 to $4000 a season, depending how qualified they are.
    Valentine secretary Melissa Larson said coach fees can work out to "$3.20 an hour". "They're doing it for the love of the game," she said.
    Ms Larson said her club's junior, youth and community fees weren't used for first-grade costs, adding "we're transparent with our fees".
    Aspirations: A Broadmeadow Magic youth team. Picture: Jonathan Carroll
    Aspirations: A Broadmeadow Magic youth team. Picture: Jonathan Carroll
    Part of the issue with costs is that the game is funded from the bottom-up, rather than the top-down. Football Australia collects $14 from those under 18 and $33 from seniors through registration fees. Some of this money is used to pay for the Socceroos and Matildas.


    Newcastle Football chairman Steve Cucumanovski said the high cost of fees comes down to a lack of money at the top of the game.
    He said the rugby league and AFL grassroots were propped up with big TV revenues. Those codes also gain more crowd revenue.
    Mr Temelkovski also highlighted this issue, saying this was partly why "our sport is pay to play".
    "The hard thing is, the better your child is at playing the sport, the more you seem to have to pay. That's the reality," he said.
    He believed the price of youth football was a worthy issue to discuss, but said "I don't think there's an easy answer". "Is there a ceiling there and when we hit that point what is the impact?"
    He said it was worth comparing the price of football to other youth activities like dancing, ballet and swimming.


    Charlestown Azzurri secretary Roger Steel believed the NPL youth fees "are higher than they should be".
    "It's a lot of money for kids' sport, but there are all sorts of costs like competition and refereeing fees that have to be distributed among players," Mr Steel said.
    There are fewer volunteers available nowadays, so clubs had to pay people to do jobs. Clubs in Sydney or Melbourne are charging youth fees of $2500 to $3000, but "they have requirements that aren't imposed on us yet, like having full-time technical directors".
    He said a lot of parents see their kids "as a future champion and are willing to pay whatever it takes".
    As well as NPL fees, some parents pay for private training in Newcastle through programs run by the likes of former Jets player Jobe Wheelhouse and former Jets coach Clayton Zane.
    "Parents are driven to help their child succeed at sport, but very few players end up making it to the top," Mr Steel said.


    Mr Steel added that clubs know "it's not right" to use youth fees to pay seniors.
    Maitland Magpies football manager Mick Mirisch said "from our perspective, no youth or JDL payments should cover any player payments for seniors".
    "That's the way it should be. It's as simple as that," Mr Mirisch said.

    A memo that Northern NSW Football sent to clubs in October said fees must reflect "actual expenses related to the player's participation in a competition".
    The onus is on the clubs to satisfy the governing bodies that the fees are reasonable.


    "Clubs are not permitted to 'bundle' other expenses [including player payments], which are not directly related to the player's participation in a competition."
    Northern NSW Football has developed a budget template to help clubs "isolate expenses specifically related to the competition in which the player participates".
    The memo acknowledged that the fees imposed by the vast majority of clubs were reasonable and "volunteers commit significant time to implementing a range of fundraising activities to keep their fees as low as possible".
    Clubs can use the youth fees for coaching, playing strips, ground and facility maintenance, football equipment, competition and referee fees, field hire, administration and awards.
    "Clubs need money to provide the football experience that parents are expecting. A kid playing NPL youth is a completely different experience to someone playing community football," Mr Eland said.
    He added that some clubs have a lot more costs than others "when it comes to running facilities".


    There are also community concerns that disadvantaged families cannot afford to pay the youth fees, but clubs and Northern NSW Football insist they do address this.
    Macquarie Football Association general manager Warren Read urged players who leave premier league clubs to consider returning to community football to play for fun. Another concern among the footballing public is registration fees for community players. All-age players are being charged about $440 this season.
    This includes, in one example, $157 to the club, $67 to the council for ground use, $133 to Northern NSW Football [the governing body], $50 to the zone association and $33 to Football Australia [the national body]. "The cost for a social game of football is getting out of control," one all-age player said. "We are losing young players."
    In the Hunter, the average community registration fee is $165 (5-7s), $200 (8-11s), $255 (12-18s) and $360 (19+). Parents can use the $100 Active Kids voucher towards the fees. Mr Eland is confident that football "remains affordable and accessible for families".

  11. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Hacker View Post
    Dream to play pro sport stings the pocket as Hunter parents pay up to $2000 for kids to play

    By Damon Cronshaw
    Updated February 19 2022 - 10:24am, first published 5:30am


    Parents are paying up to $2000 for their kids to play premier league football in the Hunter, as they pursue the dream of a professional career in the sport.
    Many are willing to pay the fees, amid aspirations to higher levels of competition, excellence, achievement and status. Some, though, are concerned about where the money is going and how far prices will rise in future.


    .
    Thanks heaps for posting that. Had a bit of a sensationalist headline, when in truth I doubt anyone is paying $2k a season in Newcastle. The discussion could be a good one, but seems to be a bit of a non story handled by the herald. Innuendo that Juniors are paying seniors, but clubs generally breakdown their fees now and parents can see where the money is going. The news never actually seems to break down the cost and talk about how many training sessions a year, plus preseason including games almost every weekend before the season etc etc. I don't think its a big cost per session compared to what you are paying for private training or in other sports like dancing / gymnastics / tennis and sports where you pay per session / week. I'm sure there are cheaper sports as well but I don't know a lot about what kids are getting, is it the same / more / less?

  12. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by KITZ View Post
    Thanks heaps for posting that. Had a bit of a sensationalist headline, when in truth I doubt anyone is paying $2k a season in Newcastle. The discussion could be a good one, but seems to be a bit of a non story handled by the herald. Innuendo that Juniors are paying seniors, but clubs generally breakdown their fees now and parents can see where the money is going. The news never actually seems to break down the cost and talk about how many training sessions a year, plus preseason including games almost every weekend before the season etc etc. I don't think its a big cost per session compared to what you are paying for private training or in other sports like dancing / gymnastics / tennis and sports where you pay per session / week. I'm sure there are cheaper sports as well but I don't know a lot about what kids are getting, is it the same / more / less?
    Totally agree,instead of a good discussion on where the money goes people will just scoff at all the mums and dads thinking their kid is destined for the Premier League.I think the bigger discussion is where the money for the Federations goes to and what is the result of it.Its great putting shit on clubs but as everyone knows without an overwhelming percentage of free labour nothing gets done at that level.How many people within the Zone/NNSW and FFA work for free and what are they producing for the amount of money that goes there?Problem is we all know that cant change without massive upheaval no one seems to want that fight so around and around we go again.

  13. #93
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    Just another thing,i estimate my son pays about $13 per session of football experience every year (rego divided by training sessions/games).Not sure he could rent a tennis court or go 10 pin bowling for that much.Its just the amount of sessions per year that add the cost up.But this year he'll get to work with 1st grade coaches,get mentored by experienced players,train and play on some of the best facilities in the city and most of all be happy to be part of a really good community.i think its worth it, others may disagree.

  14. #94
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    If you believe youth money isnít used to pay first graders then you live with the fairyís

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    If Eland thinks players aren't getting paid well he is either turning a blind eye or totally clueless.
    As for youth coaches attracting coaching fees of up to $4k is ludicrous. If coaches command those fees we should be getting better results in player development.

  16. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by travellingman View Post
    If Eland thinks players aren't getting paid well he is either turning a blind eye or totally clueless.
    As for youth coaches attracting coaching fees of up to $4k is ludicrous. If coaches command those fees we should be getting better results in player development.
    Mr Eland knows very well that payments exist. He also turns a blind eye because of the legal status that it draws his organisation into. Regardless, he is responsible to oversee the game locally, clubs paying out more than they earn, Youth NPL teams paying fees to supplement Seniors and after what I have seen over the last few weeks, if $2400 justifies some of the "qualified" coaching in NPL, we need a Royal Commission. De couple Youth, audit clubs spending and cap funds across two segments. Youth money goes to Youth football. Every NPL program in town will be broke in 12 mths.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BBscone View Post
    Mr Eland knows very well that payments exist. He also turns a blind eye because of the legal status that it draws his organisation into. Regardless, he is responsible to oversee the game locally, clubs paying out more than they earn, Youth NPL teams paying fees to supplement Seniors and after what I have seen over the last few weeks, if $2400 justifies some of the "qualified" coaching in NPL, we need a Royal Commission. De couple Youth, audit clubs spending and cap funds across two segments. Youth money goes to Youth football. Every NPL program in town will be broke in 12 mths.
    Lol
    Exactly right

  18. #98
    Quote Originally Posted by The Hacker View Post
    Dream to play pro sport stings the pocket as Hunter parents pay up to $2000 for kids to play

    By Damon Cronshaw
    Updated February 19 2022 - 10:24am, first published 5:30am


    Parents are paying up to $2000 for their kids to play premier league football in the Hunter, as they pursue the dream of a professional career in the sport.
    Many are willing to pay the fees, amid aspirations to higher levels of competition, excellence, achievement and status. Some, though, are concerned about where the money is going and how far prices will rise in future.

    Various National Premier League [NPL] club insiders believe some youth fees are being used towards paying first grade players at some clubs to varying degrees.
    Northern NSW Football has warned clubs that youth fees cannot be used to pay senior players.
    The clubs aim to cover player payments for first graders with sponsorship from companies and benefactors, along with gate receipts and canteen revenue.

    First-grade players can generally earn payments per match of about $200 to $250 (rookies) and $350 to $500 (experienced). Top players stepping down from the A-League can earn about $1000 to $1500 a match. Some suspect the fees for the ex-pros are rising higher.
    Dream to play pro sport stings the pocket as Hunter parents pay up to $2000 for kids to play
    Dream to play pro sport stings the pocket as Hunter parents pay up to $2000 for kids to play
    Team budgets for player payments can generally run from about $55,000 to $180,000 a season.
    There is also a push to pay senior female players, with the inaugural season of the Northern NSW National Premier Leagues Women (NPLW) to begin next month.
    Northern NSW Football chief executive David Eland said "players can be paid, but they have to be on a professional contract".
    "There are no professional contracts within our competitions - our NPL and NPLW are amateur competitions," Mr Eland said.
    "There's an amount of up to $110 a week where clubs can reimburse players for expenses incurred whilst playing. But strictly, by the National Registration Regulations, we don't have any professional players."
    Asked if the clubs could be semi-professional, Mr Eland said: "No, there's no such thing".


    Mr Eland said consultation was occurring with clubs to introduce professional contracts. This is linked to plans for the top senior league to have "professional status". "That is aligned to the A-League, domestic calendar and has big implications for our competitions."
    As for youth fees, Mr Eland encouraged parents to ask clubs what they include. "Clubs are run by hardworking volunteers and they put a lot of work in to determine the fees. It's not up to us to micromanage the clubs."
    He said the NPL youth fees "vary significantly" from club to club because they were run differently. The junior and youth fees range from about $1000 to $2000 a season, depending on the club.
    Adamstown Rosebud secretary Rick Naylor said he was opposed to youth payments being used to pay seniors.
    Dream to play pro sport stings the pocket as Hunter parents pay up to $2000 for kids to play
    Dream to play pro sport stings the pocket as Hunter parents pay up to $2000 for kids to play
    "Youth fees should cover the cost of youth football. They shouldn't be subsidising the expenses a club incurs elsewhere," Mr Naylor said.


    "When we register our JDL [Junior Development League under 9s-12s] and youth players [under 13s-16s], we present the players and parents with a spreadsheet, showing them exactly where the money goes.
    "The youth and JDL fees are quarantined from seniors."
    Mr Naylor said Adamstown aimed to promote youth players through the ranks to first grade.
    "We'd like to think that many of our first grade players are playing because they love playing football."
    Broadmeadow Magic president Tony Temelkovski said "all fees collected from youth are pumped back into the youth".
    "The criteria for kids playing at a higher level means there's a certain standard of coaching we need to provide at club level," he said.


    "An average NPL youth coach spends 475 to 500 hours a year coaching the side. We run a 40-week program for our NPL youth."
    Youth coaches can attract about $1500 to $4000 a season, depending how qualified they are.
    Valentine secretary Melissa Larson said coach fees can work out to "$3.20 an hour". "They're doing it for the love of the game," she said.
    Ms Larson said her club's junior, youth and community fees weren't used for first-grade costs, adding "we're transparent with our fees".
    Aspirations: A Broadmeadow Magic youth team. Picture: Jonathan Carroll
    Aspirations: A Broadmeadow Magic youth team. Picture: Jonathan Carroll
    Part of the issue with costs is that the game is funded from the bottom-up, rather than the top-down. Football Australia collects $14 from those under 18 and $33 from seniors through registration fees. Some of this money is used to pay for the Socceroos and Matildas.


    Newcastle Football chairman Steve Cucumanovski said the high cost of fees comes down to a lack of money at the top of the game.
    He said the rugby league and AFL grassroots were propped up with big TV revenues. Those codes also gain more crowd revenue.
    Mr Temelkovski also highlighted this issue, saying this was partly why "our sport is pay to play".
    "The hard thing is, the better your child is at playing the sport, the more you seem to have to pay. That's the reality," he said.
    He believed the price of youth football was a worthy issue to discuss, but said "I don't think there's an easy answer". "Is there a ceiling there and when we hit that point what is the impact?"
    He said it was worth comparing the price of football to other youth activities like dancing, ballet and swimming.


    Charlestown Azzurri secretary Roger Steel believed the NPL youth fees "are higher than they should be".
    "It's a lot of money for kids' sport, but there are all sorts of costs like competition and refereeing fees that have to be distributed among players," Mr Steel said.
    There are fewer volunteers available nowadays, so clubs had to pay people to do jobs. Clubs in Sydney or Melbourne are charging youth fees of $2500 to $3000, but "they have requirements that aren't imposed on us yet, like having full-time technical directors".
    He said a lot of parents see their kids "as a future champion and are willing to pay whatever it takes".
    As well as NPL fees, some parents pay for private training in Newcastle through programs run by the likes of former Jets player Jobe Wheelhouse and former Jets coach Clayton Zane.
    "Parents are driven to help their child succeed at sport, but very few players end up making it to the top," Mr Steel said.


    Mr Steel added that clubs know "it's not right" to use youth fees to pay seniors.
    Maitland Magpies football manager Mick Mirisch said "from our perspective, no youth or JDL payments should cover any player payments for seniors".
    "That's the way it should be. It's as simple as that," Mr Mirisch said.

    A memo that Northern NSW Football sent to clubs in October said fees must reflect "actual expenses related to the player's participation in a competition".
    The onus is on the clubs to satisfy the governing bodies that the fees are reasonable.


    "Clubs are not permitted to 'bundle' other expenses [including player payments], which are not directly related to the player's participation in a competition."
    Northern NSW Football has developed a budget template to help clubs "isolate expenses specifically related to the competition in which the player participates".
    The memo acknowledged that the fees imposed by the vast majority of clubs were reasonable and "volunteers commit significant time to implementing a range of fundraising activities to keep their fees as low as possible".
    Clubs can use the youth fees for coaching, playing strips, ground and facility maintenance, football equipment, competition and referee fees, field hire, administration and awards.
    "Clubs need money to provide the football experience that parents are expecting. A kid playing NPL youth is a completely different experience to someone playing community football," Mr Eland said.
    He added that some clubs have a lot more costs than others "when it comes to running facilities".


    There are also community concerns that disadvantaged families cannot afford to pay the youth fees, but clubs and Northern NSW Football insist they do address this.
    Macquarie Football Association general manager Warren Read urged players who leave premier league clubs to consider returning to community football to play for fun. Another concern among the footballing public is registration fees for community players. All-age players are being charged about $440 this season.
    This includes, in one example, $157 to the club, $67 to the council for ground use, $133 to Northern NSW Football [the governing body], $50 to the zone association and $33 to Football Australia [the national body]. "The cost for a social game of football is getting out of control," one all-age player said. "We are losing young players."
    In the Hunter, the average community registration fee is $165 (5-7s), $200 (8-11s), $255 (12-18s) and $360 (19+). Parents can use the $100 Active Kids voucher towards the fees. Mr Eland is confident that football "remains affordable and accessible for families".
    Come on dudes. All the presos coming out and saying ďwe donít use youth money for first gradeĒ. I call BS on that!

    So Rosebuds publish their fees breakdown. How many other clubs do this? Iím gonna say not many! If your club isnít saying where that money goes then you know where that money goes!!

  19. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBscone View Post
    Mr Eland knows very well that payments exist. He also turns a blind eye because of the legal status that it draws his organisation into. Regardless, he is responsible to oversee the game locally, clubs paying out more than they earn, Youth NPL teams paying fees to supplement Seniors and after what I have seen over the last few weeks, if $2400 justifies some of the "qualified" coaching in NPL, we need a Royal Commission. De couple Youth, audit clubs spending and cap funds across two segments. Youth money goes to Youth football. Every NPL program in town will be broke in 12 mths.
    Have you ever been on a club committee? Some of the higher profile players are paid by sponsors, not the clubs themselves. I mean have you forgotten that youth fees are not the only money a club brings in.

    Maybe enlighten us which games you have seen that you are criticising so much? I’m interested.

  20. #100
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
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    132
    Quote Originally Posted by KITZ View Post
    Have you ever been on a club committee? Some of the higher profile players are paid by sponsors, not the clubs themselves. I mean have you forgotten that youth fees are not the only money a club brings in.

    Maybe enlighten us which games you have seen that you are criticising so much? I’m interested.
    I agree. It might be contentious, but sponsor fees, canteen takings, gate takings and individual benefactors would provide substantial income for 1st grade players. It just doesn't seem to filter back down to the juniors to subsidise their costs.

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