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Thread: 2021 Premier Club SAP

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Retired01 View Post
    Maybe the idea is that the kids cant hide or be bypassed when locked into a small area. You may find the stronger teams aren't as free flowing once a new set of skills is needed and weaker kids occupying space.
    But just to clarify I totally agree on your point here.The very best kids in the program will thrive in any format.But there are kids who's game and skills are better suited to a bigger field.The one folly in the program has always been trying to use the cirriculum to produce just one type of player.teams need a variety of talents,and most teams in the program have a pretty good balance.The better coaches seem to have taken the strengths of the kids they have and highlighted the good and worked on the bad.

  2. #22
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    Would have joined a futsal comp if the lads wanted to play that. Maybe as a preseason day. Plus it cuts bigger sided games down for the season the season.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    Would have joined a futsal comp if the lads wanted to play that. Maybe as a preseason day. Plus it cuts bigger sided games down for the season the season.
    Not to mention it reduces the amount of actual playing time for all players.
    Each season there is a gradual reduction in time spent on the field.
    All opinions expressed here are my own.

    "Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn." -Benjamin Franklin

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aegon View Post
    Not to mention it reduces the amount of actual playing time for all players.
    Each season there is a gradual reduction in time spent on the field.
    how have past years been ran PRE-2020? Ive only been involved since last season which was 2-3 rounds longer than the regular community football season?

  5. #25
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    Because that's not what junior development is about. there is NO point going to a bigger field if you can only control the ball with your first touch 50% of the time. If you don't have those 4 core skills nailed (1v1, first touch, passing / striking the ball, and running with the ball) then you will only fall further and further behind. Because they just don't have the time in NPL to go back and teach you ball control, when the ball is kicked from the goal keeper and you consistently can't get it under control. Forget about the type of player, forget about the team. Even if a team is winning 10 nil, it doesn't mean they are nailing those skills, and it will only become really apparent when all of a sudden they play with a different team, or they want to move up a division and play with better kids. Junior development is not about the GAME. that's what the game training phase is for, but they can't teach that phase properly if the kids aren't drilled until their eyes bleed in those four core skills.

    The best advice I'd give any parent going into any development program now is to forget about what everyone else is doing and just make sure your player nails those 4 core skills, kids that have poor first touch will fall away from the higher divisions as they get older and the kids that have it nailed are moving onto more advanced game training.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by KITZ View Post
    Because that's not what junior development is about. there is NO point going to a bigger field if you can only control the ball with your first touch 50% of the time. If you don't have those 4 core skills nailed (1v1, first touch, passing / striking the ball, and running with the ball) then you will only fall further and further behind. Because they just don't have the time in NPL to go back and teach you ball control, when the ball is kicked from the goal keeper and you consistently can't get it under control. Forget about the type of player, forget about the team. Even if a team is winning 10 nil, it doesn't mean they are nailing those skills, and it will only become really apparent when all of a sudden they play with a different team, or they want to move up a division and play with better kids. Junior development is not about the GAME. that's what the game training phase is for, but they can't teach that phase properly if the kids aren't drilled until their eyes bleed in those four core skills.

    The best advice I'd give any parent going into any development program now is to forget about what everyone else is doing and just make sure your player nails those 4 core skills, kids that have poor first touch will fall away from the higher divisions as they get older and the kids that have it nailed are moving onto more advanced game training.
    in a vacuum for sure its the only thing that matters.Unfortunately by the time the kids get to 12's, training gn 2/3 nights a week then playing on weekends they need to have the fun/social aspect of the sport.The games are important to keep up their competitive side, their fitness and their overall knowledge of the game.they will just get bored and head elsewhere if its monotonous lessons all the time.
    to be clear i agree with everything you said. but the practicalities of it are the games are becoming more and more important as they get older so clubs need to cater for more aspects of the game at the older ages (empasis on older ages - no way 9s or 10s) .its a fine balance but the better teams across the 12's age groups are the ones who have the kids with the best skills.its all self perpetuating as far as im concerned. all im saying is that it doesnt take a 5 aside comp on a few weekends to know this.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Aegon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sideline88 View Post
    how have past years been ran PRE-2020? Ive only been involved since last season which was 2-3 rounds longer than the regular community football season?
    Initially it was 22 rounds with 2x games per round. 40 minute games
    Last year was 22 rounds with 1 game per round. 60 minute games.
    This year is 18 (maybe even 16) rounds with 1 game per round. 60 minute halves.
    All opinions expressed here are my own.

    "Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn." -Benjamin Franklin

  8. #28
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    KITZ, I disagree.

    Training is where you learn & develop the 4 core skills.
    Games are where you learn how use the 4 core skills.

    No amount of training can replicate game time learning.

    This is true from foundation level at sports all the way through to professional players.
    All opinions expressed here are my own.

    "Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn." -Benjamin Franklin

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by KITZ View Post
    Because that's not what junior development is about. there is NO point going to a bigger field if you can only control the ball with your first touch 50% of the time. If you don't have those 4 core skills nailed (1v1, first touch, passing / striking the ball, and running with the ball) then you will only fall further and further behind. Because they just don't have the time in NPL to go back and teach you ball control, when the ball is kicked from the goal keeper and you consistently can't get it under control. Forget about the type of player, forget about the team. Even if a team is winning 10 nil, it doesn't mean they are nailing those skills, and it will only become really apparent when all of a sudden they play with a different team, or they want to move up a division and play with better kids. Junior development is not about the GAME. that's what the game training phase is for, but they can't teach that phase properly if the kids aren't drilled until their eyes bleed in those four core skills.

    The best advice I'd give any parent going into any development program now is to forget about what everyone else is doing and just make sure your player nails those 4 core skills, kids that have poor first touch will fall away from the higher divisions as they get older and the kids that have it nailed are moving onto more advanced game training.
    1st paragraph is double dip diarrhea. Everyone just ignore that one.

    2nd paragraph is about right.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by KITZ View Post
    Because that's not what junior development is about. there is NO point going to a bigger field if you can only control the ball with your first touch 50% of the time. If you don't have those 4 core skills nailed (1v1, first touch, passing / striking the ball, and running with the ball) then you will only fall further and further behind. Because they just don't have the time in NPL to go back and teach you ball control, when the ball is kicked from the goal keeper and you consistently can't get it under control. Forget about the type of player, forget about the team. Even if a team is winning 10 nil, it doesn't mean they are nailing those skills, and it will only become really apparent when all of a sudden they play with a different team, or they want to move up a division and play with better kids. Junior development is not about the GAME. that's what the game training phase is for, but they can't teach that phase properly if the kids aren't drilled until their eyes bleed in those four core skills.

    The best advice I'd give any parent going into any development program now is to forget about what everyone else is doing and just make sure your player nails those 4 core skills, kids that have poor first touch will fall away from the higher divisions as they get older and the kids that have it nailed are moving onto more advanced game training.
    The game allows them to put those skills and develop their skills as a player, more time and more touches on the ball will help improve their individual skills.

    Game Training isn't about the GAME either, game training is about developing skills to play the game as a team and learning how the team comes together to play.

    The only time when it is about the GAME is when they become seniors and that is winning.

  11. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by KITZ View Post
    Because that's not what junior development is about. there is NO point going to a bigger field if you can only control the ball with your first touch 50% of the time. If you don't have those 4 core skills nailed (1v1, first touch, passing / striking the ball, and running with the ball) then you will only fall further and further behind. Because they just don't have the time in NPL to go back and teach you ball control, when the ball is kicked from the goal keeper and you consistently can't get it under control. Forget about the type of player, forget about the team. Even if a team is winning 10 nil, it doesn't mean they are nailing those skills, and it will only become really apparent when all of a sudden they play with a different team, or they want to move up a division and play with better kids. Junior development is not about the GAME. that's what the game training phase is for, but they can't teach that phase properly if the kids aren't drilled until their eyes bleed in those four core skills.

    The best advice I'd give any parent going into any development program now is to forget about what everyone else is doing and just make sure your player nails those 4 core skills, kids that have poor first touch will fall away from the higher divisions as they get older and the kids that have it nailed are moving onto more advanced game training.
    Iíd go 1 step further and say to any parent sending their kid into a development program to just make sure their kid falls in love with the game. If they donít want to live and breath the game, it doesnít matter how good their touch is

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goatscheese View Post
    The game allows them to put those skills and develop their skills as a player, more time and more touches on the ball will help improve their individual skills.

    Game Training isn't about the GAME either, game training is about developing skills to play the game as a team and learning how the team comes together to play.

    The only time when it is about the GAME is when they become seniors and that is winning.
    i agree with this.The way i read KITZ post was something similar.There is absolutely a difference between teams that train to win games and teams that train to put their skills into games.Im just saying that the teams that train to put their skills into games are the teams that end up winning way more anyway.I havent seen enough NPL youth to know if the emphasis on skills is thrown out the window from 13's but hopefully the first crop of SAP kids going in next year retain that priority.

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by BS detecor View Post
    I’d go 1 step further and say to any parent sending their kid into a development program to just make sure their kid falls in love with the game. If they don’t want to live and breath the game, it doesn’t matter how good their touch is
    Agree here too.Im already seeing some pretty wary kids in the program entering year 4 and the line between being super serious and looking miserable is getting blurred.Sadly i think a fair bit of the misery in inflicted by parents.We've been lucky in that there has always been a very defined line between the kids and the parents at training and games.But some places ive been i see a lot of sideline coaching at training let alone games by parents.Ive yet to see a kid turn around and say "thanks for yelling at me in front of my friends dad i am really going to take on board what you've said".

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by BS detecor View Post
    I’d go 1 step further and say to any parent sending their kid into a development program to just make sure their kid falls in love with the game. If they don’t want to live and breath the game, it doesn’t matter how good their touch is
    correct.

    I think the futsal idea should only be used as an extra. Taking away other game time is a farce. You can do 3v3 4v4 at training or any other day to get those all important touches, striking etc.

  15. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by sapdad View Post
    Agree here too.Im already seeing some pretty wary kids in the program entering year 4 and the line between being super serious and looking miserable is getting blurred.Sadly i think a fair bit of the misery in inflicted by parents.We've been lucky in that there has always been a very defined line between the kids and the parents at training and games.But some places ive been i see a lot of sideline coaching at training let alone games by parents.Ive yet to see a kid turn around and say "thanks for yelling at me in front of my friends dad i am really going to take on board what you've said".
    Hereís a good barometer. Does the kid grab a ball and have a kick with his mates, does he have a player he looks up to or does he just play when you drag him to training. Even the most serious players need a place where they can express themselves without fear of failure and they will learn more in those environments than they ever will in a structured training session.

  16. #36
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    I saw on social media over the weekend New Lambton looking for a JDL 10's coach for this year.I thought Steve on here was the coach,hope everything is ok if hes not coaching.New Lambton seem to have and a lot of turnover of coaches this year and advertising this late would be concerning for parents forking out good money.Is that normal?

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by sapdad View Post
    I saw on social media over the weekend New Lambton looking for a JDL 10's coach for this year.I thought Steve on here was the coach,hope everything is ok if hes not coaching.New Lambton seem to have and a lot of turnover of coaches this year and advertising this late would be concerning for parents forking out good money.Is that normal?
    Coaching SAP/JDL is an altogether different level of commitment than at the community level. When you consider that we now have JDL boys U9-12 and girls U10-12 (I think) this is around 140 teams.
    So 140 coaches in the Newcastle area required to train kids for 2-3 sessions a week for very little return.

    I'm surprised more clubs aren't still trying to find coaches.

    It's hard as it is just filling teams with players for some clubs.
    All opinions expressed here are my own.

    "Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn." -Benjamin Franklin

  18. #38
    Senior Member Aegon's Avatar
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    @boz-monaut

    Can you please update the name of this from "Premier Club SAP" to "Junior Development League"?
    All opinions expressed here are my own.

    "Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn." -Benjamin Franklin

  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aegon View Post
    Coaching SAP/JDL is an altogether different level of commitment than at the community level. When you consider that we now have JDL boys U9-12 and girls U10-12 (I think) this is around 140 teams.
    So 140 coaches in the Newcastle area required to train kids for 2-3 sessions a week for very little return.

    I'm surprised more clubs aren't still trying to find coaches.

    It's hard as it is just filling teams with players for some clubs.
    im not arguing its difficult to find coaches.im just saying that putting out expressions of interest after fees have been paid would be concerning for parents who have paid good money thinking they are getting a better level of coaching.Clubs are already out there trialling and in full training mode.If my kid was yet to be appointed a coach id be concerned they were getting value for money.

  20. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by sapdad View Post
    I saw on social media over the weekend New Lambton looking for a JDL 10's coach for this year.I thought Steve on here was the coach,hope everything is ok if hes not coaching.New Lambton seem to have and a lot of turnover of coaches this year and advertising this late would be concerning for parents forking out good money.Is that normal?
    G'day SapDad - yeah I'm still coaching this year; we only had one U9 team last year and have moved to two U10 teams hence the need for an extra coach.
    I've tried coaching all 20+ kids at once and it's bloody difficult.

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